Pioneers of hemp

Jason spends hours each day stripping hemp in the barn right outside their home, with the help of a few workers he has hired. The Marshalls began growing hemp when it became legal in 2013. "I think it's important to educate people between marijuana and hemp," Jason says.

“We didn’t know how a small town like this would take the hemp,” says Jason Marshall, a hemp farmer and owner of the only CBD store in Cynthiana, Rocky Ridge Hemp Company.

Jason and his wife, Ginni, run Rocky Ridge with the help on their three sons, Kaleb, Conner and Carsen. “We want to see the same work ethic in our children,” Jason says.

Jason spends long days out on the farm growing, processing and stripping the hemp, sometimes working from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.. “Farming taught me work ethic," Jason says. "To be successful, you have to put in work.”

The family is constantly on the go, but finds a way to use their business to keep them closer together. Kaleb works part time at the store, and his brothers often hang out there. “The boys are a part of it. They are in it just as deep as we are,” Ginni says. 

Jason started growing hemp when it became legal in Kentucky in 2013, making him one of the first farmers in Harrison County to do so. He and Ginni are pioneering local advocates for CBD.  They personally use it and recommend it for help with anxiety, body pain and falling asleep.

Jason is aware that many people are suspicious of hemp and CBD because they often associate those products with marijuana, which is different. CBD is derived from hemp, not marijuana.

“It’s just a plant," Jason says of hemp. "You put the seed in the ground and it grows.” 

But he's encouraged by the fact that his business is growing.  “This is the future," he says. “It’s been a struggle, but it’s finally starting to pay off.”

Jason Marshall strips hemp from the stem to process it into CBD for their family-run store. Jason and his wife Ginni are advocates for using CBD for anxiety, body pain and help with sleep. "It's just a plant. You put the seed in the ground and it grows," Jason says.
Jason prepares to harvest hemp in a field before a huge rainstorm comes in. "Overall it's been a struggle but finally is starting to pay off," Jason says of his business.
Jason was born in Cynthiana on a farm, which motivated him to continue as a farmer after graduating high school. "I've been living on a farm my whole life," he says. "I don't know any different."
Jason hangs his hemp up to dry in the barn after harvesting early that morning. He is in charge of all the growing and processing of the hemp at the farm. "It's mainly hard work and long days," he says.